Future of Work


The Bene FUTUR OF WORK Report is offering a comprehensive overview of what the future of work could look like. The report is based on specialized literature and on the opinion of 40 experts from well-established international companies, startups, science, and consulting firms. Our team has led numerous interviews with opinion leaders and hosted round table discussions in Berlin, London and Vienna.

Chapters


Overview Digital Transformation

Digital Transformation


Digital transformation is entering all areas of our lives, revolutionizing how we work and live. This chapter takes a closer look at how digital business models, robotics, artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things and other digital technologies influence and change life as we know it.

Digital business models

It’s no longer the best product that garners the most success. Experts seem to agree that, in the future, businesses that generate the best data and turn it into the best services will come in first. Even so, the sharing economy and tendencies of giveaway culture also have a downside: Users make their data transparent and thus more vulnerable to manipulation.

Robots and artificial intelligence

The young generation of digital natives is expected to deliver intuitive and promising solutions. Various forms of artificial intelligence will increasingly help them. At the same time, routine tasks in production and administration will be performed by robots. While people believe that this development will give individuals greater freedom to do what they enjoy, they are at the same time wary of a difficult transitional phase, in which many people will lose their jobs.

Internet of Things

One of the last years’ buzzwords describes a world in which not only smartphones and tablets are linked in networks. Everyday objects like refrigerators or washing machines will also be connected as they collect, communicate and process data. These new smart devices will have a life of their own, programmed to invisibly assist people at home and at work. The lasting changes these developments will bring about have garnered reactions ranging from breathtakingly impressed to frightened.

Other transformational technologies

Technological developments in 3D printing, 3D projectors, VR glasses etc. will have a lasting effect on our daily lives. While some see them as positive innovations in a globalized, mobilized working world, sceptics fear our lives will gradually be taken over and dictated by new technologies.

 

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Digital Business Models

Digital Business Models


„One advantage of digital business models is that it’s now much quicker to test the potential of new ideas using simple tools such as click rates and A-B tests. We soon know if a theory or an idea for a product or a set-up is promising.”
Mark Poppenborg

Increasing numbers of organisations are facing the issue of digitalisation, and how their businesses should react to it. The answer is not always to digitise their entire business model. It is far more common only to adapt elements of the value-added network. The digital revolution has shown the absurdity of long-term planning. The goal is always the same: to be a more agile organisation where correct decisions can be implemented more quickly and cost-effectively. In the modern world of VUCA, it is more a question of being able to react quickly to change. A digital business model has the same effect on production speed and the degree of automation as it does on processing quality. There is a similar need to rethink approaches to tasks, use of technology and data exchange, as there is to redefine relationships to customers, partners and competitors.

 

Read more in the full report on:

  • Phenomena pressuring the business world
  • Central changes for businesses

 

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Robotics & Artificial Intelligence

Robotics & Artificial Intelligence


„Intelligent systems are already self-learning today. By calculating an infinite number of examples, they find new solutions that humans could never conceive. We can’t even retrace how the machine came up with its suggestion. Deeply fascinating, but also a bit spooky.”
Lars Gaede

The major advances in robotics and artificial intelligence we are currently experiencing are based on three factors. Firstly, on rapidly increasing processing power, which allows machines to react and make decisions in the blink of an eye. Secondly, on the growing volume of data: by comparing a situation with a seemingly endless number of examples, a robot or processor can identify patterns and react specifically to solve problems. And thirdly, on algorithms, which are becoming more and more optimised. Experts note that machines have surpassed human intelligence in many fields. But human acceptance is the decisive factor in determining whether, and to what extent, artificial intelligence will spread and enter our private and work lives.

“Today – at least for an averagely tech-savvy person – it is nearly impossible to escape automated data-collecting and processing environments. As soon as you use Amazon, Google, Facebook or maybe Siri on your iPhone, you hand your personal data to artificial intelligence software. We should all be aware of this,” remarks Prof. Michael Bartz, professor of the International Business Institute, IMC University of Applied Sciences, Krems.

“Facebook experimented with two artificial general intelligences which developed their own language, which was much more efficient than ours. This new language was much shorter for expressing their kind of ideas and the human programmers were no longer able to understand it. That was very creative actually. When we go further than machine learning, when we go into artificial general intelligence, then we come into areas that have the potential to be creative. I am afraid of that.” Petra Hauser

 

Read more in the full report on:

  • What do experts think will change?
  • What added value do humans have to offer?

 

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The Internet of Things

The Internet of Things


„At the moment, we don’t even know what a strong currency our data is, or how much we could purchase with it. I wonder whether in future we’ll be more inclined to be frugal with our data than our money.“
Prof. Christoph Mandl Ph.D.

Our experts agree that our lives will be increasingly changed by using networked objects, which communicate independently and help their owners to carry out particular tasks, as will the closely linked development of “big data”. According to the market research institute Gartner, over eight billion things will be networked around the world by the end of 2017, and by 2020 the number is set to rise to over 20 billion. Gartner estimates that two billion dollars will be invested in the technology globally in 2017. A growing trend.

Smart Routines

Intelligent net worked systems in a smart office are now seen as essential for economic success. This view is found in the 2016 publication “Zukunftschance Digitalisierung” issued by the German Federal Ministry for Economics and Energy (BMWi), and elsewhere. Employees are also making ever higher demands in this area. According to the “Future Workforce Study 2016” by Dell and Intel, 52 percent of German employees are satisfied with their current office equipment, yet 38 percent of respondents believe that their “office is not modern enough”. For Generation Y, who grew up with the internet, smartphones and tablet PCs, modern communication technology is even more important. According to the Future Workforce Study, an intelligent work place is a key criterion when they chose employers. In this context, they expect new inspiration to come from augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR) and connection to the Internet of Things.

 

Read more in the full report on:

  • Smart Workplace Environments
  • Cyber security affects everyone

 

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Other Digital Technologies

Other Digital Technologies


„Physical proximity to other people is a key ingredient in innovation. That’s the strength of Silicon Valley.”
Prof. Christoph Mandl Ph.D.

As digital technologies continue to develop rapidly, companies have a greater need than ever to question their business models and processes. After big data, robotics, artificial intelligence and the Internet of Things, this chapter will focus on the other three drivers of the digital revolution; 3D printing, virtual and augmented reality.

3D PRINTING

Studies show that 3D printing will transform entire sectors. Bioprinting, using 3D print to produce human tissue structures, is already used in medical research. It is not yet possible to reproduce human organs, but work on the idea is underway. Likwise, “customised medicines” to combat diabetes and high blood pressure are already on the market. If 3D printing is making in-roads into such a highly sensitive and tightly controlled field as medicine, we must ask ourselves what else customers might soon be able to print to their own specifications? It is already possible to 3D print an entire house in just 24 hours and, experts say, we can assume that many production companies will need to rethink their skill sets

There is a link between neuroscience and architecture – buildings affect the way you think. Our brains can’t help but react to the spaces we occupy. That’s the fascinating thing about how to marry up the increasingly digital world – as all of us spend a huge amount of time in virtuality – with the physical working environment. For me, ‘place’ has real meaning, and I think this meaning will only get more important in an increasingly virtual world.” Philip Tidd

 

Read more in the full report on:

  • Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality
  • Building relationships requires physical presence

 

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Overview Leadership

Leadership


77 percent of business leaders in Germany believe that we need a paradigm shift in leadership culture (Next Germany, Zukunftsinstitut 2017, p35). Network economy doesn’t work so well with traditional hierarchal structures, but rather thrives on cooperation, self-organization and teamwork among equals. This chapter explores how businesses organize themselves and manage their staff in the future.

Self-adaptive systems

The fact that businesses are fluid systems and not static entities, is often overlooked. Many things can neither be anticipated, nor planned, as human interactions constantly change and evolve. It is up to smart leaders to understand and support this co-evolution and to support employees in their learning process and teamwork efforts.

Self-organization

As work processes are becoming more and more complex and difficult to standardize, executives’ expectations are changing, too. Nowadays, managers seek employees who deal with their tasks independently and self-sufficiently. Experts agree that trust and responsibility are key factors in this development, which can also have positive effects on motivation and stability.

Fluid leadership

In an unpredictable, globalized, and increasingly complex world, traditional management mechanisms like instruction & control no longer get the job done (GDI Impuls 3, 2016 „Die Leadermacher“). Like an orchestra conductor or coach, managers face the challenge of coordinating their staff to reach a common goal. This requires staying focussed on the big picture, while also paying attention to people’s individual strengths and weaknesses. In this sense, ‘fluid’ stands for a new permeability in business structures, going beyond traditional communication channels and hierarchies.

Employee engagement

Experts agree that the well-being of employees is often neglected as a determining factor for business success. This chapter takes a closer look at the growing need for a healthy work-life balance. We discuss how introvert and extrovert types thrive in different work settings and how positive relations to colleagues and leaders can favourably influence both a sense of well-being and productivity.

 

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Self-adaptive Systems

Self-adaptive Systems


“I like to compare leaders with music conductors, who are ultimately responsible for coordinating a group of people with different skills to reach a common objective.”
Prof. Marion Weissenberger-Eibl, Ph.D.

VUCA (an acronym for volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity) refers to the changed and changing conditions that have upended traditional corporate structures and leadership principles in recent years. Ever-growing amounts of data and information are generated and exchanged all over the world at unprecedented speed. This leads to an equally accelerated rate of change, visible, for example, in stock markets’ increased volatility. Uncertainty is also on the rise, as variables and their causalities become more and more difficult to follow. One example is the rise of disruptive businesses – one of the last years’ buzzwords – which stands for the development of new markets replacing old ones practically overnight. There has also been a steep increase in ambiguity when it comes to information. It is becoming more and more difficult to find clear interpretations, while misunderstandings are multiplying. The complexity of our lives, the multi-layered, multi-channelled interaction of many, at times unknown, variables will continue to increase along with the growing stream of data. Our system, our relationships to each other and the flow of decision-relevant knowledge have undergone fundamental changes.

 

Read more in the full report on:

  • What are self-adaptive Systems?
  • What does leadership culture mean?

 

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Self-Organisation

Self-Organisation


“It’s not true that staff need an internally-generated goal to orient themselves by. They know perfectly well what needs to be done to keep the customer happy, to get the job done properly, and conduct themselves accordingly. To that extent, I’d say that self-organisation has a much better chance of adding value smoothly and efficiently than the illusion of classical management.”
Mark Poppenborg

More and more businesses are realising that internal bureaucracy and monitoring processes bring less in success than they cost in time and energy, which could be better invested in external added value processes. The goal is to free people up to turn their attention outwards, towards the market, and to reduce the burden of internal processes.

“Self-organisation” is a hot topic in this area. It means that teams are at their most effective when there is no top-down imposed hierarchy with responsibilities pooled by a manager. It is more about giving teams the freedom to direct their own customer- and market-focussed actions, according to need. Who is responsible for what, and when, varies from project to project, and will be agreed within the team. Decision-making is not aimed at getting a group consensus, but at giving the final say to the person with the relevant skills.

 

Read more in the full report on:

  • Hierarchies and power structures hinder agility
  • Self-Organisation – the new magic bullet?
  • A leadership vision

 

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Fluid Leadership

Fluid Leadership


“Today, managers can no longer know everything and have all the ideas themselves. They need to swallow their narcissism and make the most of their employees’ skills.”
Boris Gloger

In a network economy, undergoing drastic change, ever more new abilities are gaining importance, what we learnt at university is often already irrelevant, and we may find ourselves asking who should lead. Those with most experience, the most appropriate training, the best relationships or other key skills? It is frequently clear that companies can only fulfil their true potential when management are prepared to follow employees who have greater skill in particular areas. Meanwhile, power plays and dominance can be a hindrance because staff on the ground are often better placed to assess the most customer-focused decision to take in a situation.

Martin Pongratz, head of Workplace Strategy CEE, CBRE describes current developments: “at the moment, organisations are shifting into a kind of organic cell situation, where you somehow have a leadership that sets clear boundaries, an outside and an inside. A nucleus that ensures the inside of this cell has the right equilibrium to survive and grow. A fluid system manages on its own, led, here and there, by the nucleus who issues some command to change things in a certain direction, but it is not particularly clear, it is fluid.” These changes are already being seen in a lot of companies today, as Hermann Arnold, author; co- founder, CEO, Haufe-umantis AG underlines: “today, everyone has to be able to lead. Management doesn’t always mean directing whole projects or teams. A lot of the particular tasks employees have to carry out today require skills that would once have been the boss’s responsibility. That means that everybody has to be able to lead, and also follow from time to time.”

 

Read more in the full report on:

  • Fluid Organisational Structure
  • Quintessential Leadership
  • Prerequisites: Selfreflection and emotional intelligence

 

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Employee Engagement

Employee Engagement


“Maybe we have to work less to be more productive.”
Martina Schöggl

Work-life-balance and employee wellbeing are familiar topics in today’s business community. Yet for many, the question of the extent to which soft factors make a measurable contribution to corporate success is still open. When push comes to shove, or in hard financial times, it often seems easiest at first to economise on staff. It is often only in retrospect that you start to wonder about the consequences of colleagues working too hard, or feeling pressured for other reasons, by which time it may be too late. Although company loyalty to staff, and vice versa, have demonstrably declined, the experts believe that its employees are still among any organisation’s most valuable resources. Prof. Christian Blümelhuber, Ph.D., professor for Strategic Organisational Communication, Berlin University of Art, explains: “it seems to me that when employees are happy, they are not only more efficient, but more loyal to the brand. That doesn’t mean that you do everything your staff want – it’s more about balance and fairness.” “We are now realising that if your workforce are happy and motivated they will deliver more productivity to you. There is an understanding now that there is a greater connection between the wellbeing of staff and the health and wellbeing of the business. Some of the impacts are physical, such as the right amount of light, the right amount of oxygen, having elements of nature, but there are also social impacts about how you connect, the feeling that you are in a community etc. The power of the social is clearly a very important aspect of wellness in the workplace,” adds Tom Lloyd, co-founder, PearsonLloyd.

 

Read more in the full report on:

  • Wellbeing is personal
  • Involving Employees

 

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Overview Purpose of Work

Purpose of Work


While what makes a job purposeful means different things for different people, experts agree that the idea of finding purpose in work is becoming more and more important. What employees expect from their work is becoming increasingly nuanced. Especially young talents are becoming more pronounced in their wishes. Policymakers face the challenge of adapting the existing educational system and labour laws to tomorrow’s needs.

The meaning of work

Millennials have high demands when it comes to their employers. Work is not only supposed to be fun, it should also serve a higher purpose. Customers are no longer the only ones who base their decision for a product or service on a company’s social and environmental behaviour; today’s employees are just as critical of the business they work for.

Employer branding

A business trying to recruit tomorrow’s talent has to offer more than a decent salary and attractive benefits. Organizational culture and individual development opportunities have become major points for job seekers. A healthy work-life balance has also never been as important as today.

New ways we work

Digital transformation and globalization go hand in hand with the trend of more unconventional forms of work. People are paid for the work they get done instead of for hours spent in the office; work conditions in general have become more flexible. Workshifting, for example, describes a modern concept based on defining work independently from time or place. Models like this subsequently bring about changes in leadership styles and communication strategies within and between businesses.

Socio-political effects

Robots taking over routine tasks in production are a phenomenon we are familiar with. Thanks to the continuous development of artificial intelligence, even more jobs will be passed on to machines in the future, some fear. At the same time, this will create new job profiles, requiring new skills and qualifications. As a result, voices calling for timely reforms and adjustments in education and labour laws are becoming louder.

 

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The meaning of work

The meaning of work


“In Europe, work-life integration is definitely an issue around personal fulfilment. The opportunities to work autonomously and creatively, to create your own scope and to be able to talk to interesting people, whether colleagues or management, are increasingly important to us.”
Prof. Marion Weissenberger-Eibl, Ph.D.

Everybody has a different idea of what makes work meaningful, the experts agree. The fundamental hope, however, is that increased use of machines for routine tasks and introducing an unconditional basic income will mean that more and more of us will be able to pursue activities we find worthwhile. The meaning of work for an individual and a clear shared vision within a company are powerful motivating factors. Lars Gaede, journalist; co-founder workawesome.com, is certain that: “if people work in a job that appears meaningful for them because they are creating something, building a house, establishing a start-up, caring for someone, bringing up children etc, then they are intrinsically motivated. Work provides a sense of purpose in the lives of many people. Many people who have a job that makes them unhappy may look for a hobby instead, but I really am convinced that there are very few people who are happy simply doing nothing.” In this context, however, it is also stressed that worrying about meaningful work or even “voting with your wallet” – i.e. shopping so as to shape the world you want to live in – still only affect those lucky few who can afford it. “There are privileged people who can engage with the meaning of value, but there are also very many situations where the only role of employment is to provide a paycheque. Of course it would be nice if the management created a model of value that enabled everyone to see their work as meaningful, whatever their income,” adds Anne-Sophie Tombeil, Ph.D., Service and Human Resources Management, Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Engineering IAO.

 

Read more in the full report on:

  • The growing importance of meaningfulness
  • Corporate purpose needs to adapt

 

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Employer Brading

Employer Branding


“Successful companies make the values that matter to their staff – e.g empathy, cooperation and esteem – an active part of their culture.”
Patrick Kenzler

There is consensus that company loyalty towards staff, and vice versa, has declined. Anne-Sophie Tombeil, Ph.D., Service and Human Resources Management, Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Engineering IAO: “working relationships in general are more flexible. Instead of seeking long-term commitment to a company you usually keep your options open, only staying while you’re happy or it makes sense for you. If something no longer fits, employees will be off.” There are many reasons for this. As mentioned above, however, young talents in particular are increasingly looking for jobs where they can take decisions and responsibility, and which suit their value systems. Robert Ehlert, co-founder, CEO, Smart in Culture, speaks from experience: “empirical investigations show that top talents leave their companies because nothing changes. I’m hearing increasingly often that many are even leaving better-paid jobs for positions where they can take on more responsibility and really implement projects.”

 

Read more in the full report on:

  • The attraction of corporate culture
  • Structures must match value systems
  • The office as decisive factor

 

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New ways we work

New ways we work


“In a flexible world, the work place is a little bit like the fire and the tribe.”
Ali Ganjavian

Studies like the Global Workshifting Index from Citrix Systems (2012) attest that work is becoming increasingly mobile and more location-independent. In recent years, many companies adopted work-shifting approaches, being careful to provide a technological working environment that made it possible to work from home and elsewhere, but now the trend is in another direction. In 2017 it emerged, for example, that the IT firm IBM was pulling its staff back from the home office to work on site. The argument goes that true creativity and inspiration can only develop “shoulder by shoulder”. Although the spotlight is swinging back to the usefulness of being physically present for certain tasks, greater flexibility is now expected in many respects. It is not just the Generation Y who are used to being able to access their information anywhere – at the airport, in a co-working space etc. A move towards project-oriented working practices is becoming increasingly noticeable on the contract side too. Tamara Carleton, Ph.D., CEO, founder, Innovation Leadership Board, describes it thus: “we follow more of a Hollywood model of operation that means depending on the programme or initiative, we assemble the talent we need, set that up, ensure the delivery, oversee quality and we may or may not tap the same people for the next initiative.”

 

Read more in the full report on:

  • Technological change modifying types of work
  • The significance of the workplace

 

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Socio-political Effects

Socio-political effects


“We have to understand society, because it reflects the micro-cosmos of work. The workplace reflects what is happening all around us, on the national and global levels. The relationships of demographics, well-being and politics are being represented within the workplace in small ways.”
Tom Lloyd

The issues already discussed go beyond the world of business – they are a hot topic in society as a whole. In the earlier chapters, it has often sounded as though they depend on each individual. We should stress that this would be a one-sided view, dividing the world into winners and losers. By contrast, the experts think it vital to also consider social safety nets. The perspectives above are about “me”, focussing on self-organisation and personal initiative, but this section deals with a collective sense of “us”.

 

Read more in the full report on:

  • New basic conditions for future work
  • Challenges to existing education systems

 

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Overview Open Collaboration

Open Collaboration


Numerous studies confirm that collaborative businesses – where individual achievements are channelled into the efforts of a common whole – have more long-term success on the market than others (GDI Impuls No. 3, 2016, “To Bee or not to Bee”, Peter Gloor)
. Practices of inter-divisional collaboration and bilateral exchange between businesses have never been as widespread as today.

Interaction between people

As businesses delve deeper into digital transformation and global presence, they must also deal with the side effect of depersonalization. Experts agree that we need places where people – as social beings – can fulfil their need for personal exchange. This holds true for both work environments and contact points for customers.

Interaction between people and machines

In the future, nearly all sectors will increasingly apply artificial intelligence. Issues that arise when people and machines intersect must be resolved as soon as possible, experts believe.

Interaction for innovation

Silicon Valley is a perfect example of how productive letting go of the idea of perfectionism can be. And how important it is to involve customers in the development process. The increasing opening of the innovation process makes it more necessary than ever to incorporate impulses and know-how from external partners and experts.

 

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Interaction between people

Interaction between people


“People need to come together, even to connect and to meet and socialise. After all, humans are social animals, we need to be together as well. I think home work will definitely have a part to play in the future, but will not replace the idea of going to the office. There will always be a need to bring people together.”
Tom Lloyd

Digitalisation and the internationalisation of companies can lead to depersonalisation. Although there is a trend for increased virtual dialogue, this can result in many non-verbal messages getting lost. “Some conversations can be conducted perfectly well via video conferencing, chat rooms, on the phone etc. But for more complex issues, it’s important also to meet regularly in person. Management breakouts need to leave room for frank and sometimes controversial discussions. That takes both time and physical space,” says Peter Schuhmacher, Ph.D., president, Process Research & Chemical Engineering, BASF. “Human nature relies on bonding. Research shows that the best projects start when people meet one another and get to know each other in informal ways, such a grabbing a beer together in the evenings. That said, you can still work and talk effectively, and collaborate with people that you don’t see in person. But you have to be more sensitive to the dynamics on a Skype chat or when you are exchanging emails. There, you can’t rely on the same non-verbal cues and human emotions,” Tamara Carleton, Ph.D., CEO, founder, Innovation Leadership Group LLC, agrees.

 

Read more in the full report on:

  • Creating human relationships
  • “Feeling” a place

 

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Interaction between humans and machines

Interaction between humans and machines


“The office remains a human question.”
Prof. James Woudhuysen

Industrial robots have been helping people with routine tasks in production facilities since the late 60s. “We already have automation processes and use digital technology in the manufacturing sector and this topic is growing. It is not some development that will start in the future,” explains Julia Bock-Schappelwein, Austrian Institute of Economic Research. We now assume that hybrid forms in particular, where people and machines work closely together, will be more widely used in many sectors. Defining the interfaces seems to be the most important issue facing the experts here. The question hovering in the air is: which tasks will be done by people and which by machines. “We won’t be able to halt developments. It’s more about rethinking and learning in very different sectors, with very different services and customer needs,” says Rober Ehlert, founder, CEO, Smart in Culture, for example.

Better together

“The most accurate view isn’t that we now have artificial intelligence to substitute for the human sort. Rather, the best results will come from human skills that are augmented by IT,” explains Prof. James Woudhuysen, journalist; visiting professor, London South Bank University. There are many areas where we can no longer do without support from artificial intelligence – for example in certain research fields. “Thanks to intelligent algorithms, computers produce results from huge amounts of data that humans alone couldn’t manage. But it doesn’t yet work without the people. It’s more a case that people can do more with computers than they can do alone,” says Peter Schuhmacher, Ph.D., president, Process Research & Chemical Engineering, BASF, speaking from experience. Another example of successful cooperation between humans and machines is the use of bots in sales talks. The salesperson conducts the conversation with the customer, but with artificial intelligence listening in and giving occasional tips on which points to emphasise.

 

Read more in the full report on:

  • “Human” Abilities
  • “Intelligent” Leadership

 

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Innovation needs interaction

Innovation needs interaction


“Innovation always works bottom to top. It’s not only faster, it’s also more credible.”
Patrick Aertsen

Only a few decades ago, academics still brooded in private ivory towers, but most innovations today emerge from interdisciplinary dialogue. “In complex environments, no single brain can come up with innovations alone. Today that needs teamwork. It’s essential for ideas to cross-pollinate. It’s more important than ever for companies to create an inspiring framework, where ideas can continue actively developing,” says Anne-Sophie Tombeil, Ph.D., Service and Human Resources Management, Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Engineering IAO. As evidence for this, growing numbers of forward thinking companies are setting up purpose-built innovation labs, which offer ideal facilities for a temporary meeting place where ideas can be implemented.

The experts are also unanimous that a team spirit must be consciously fostered. “I’ve never seen a good creative process where five strangers came together. When people know and trust each other, the creative process gets far better results. More absurd, less conventional,” says Herbert Hetzel, CEO, owner, Bau-Consult GmbH. In this spirit, big organisations need to foster a creative environment that can cope with the new challenges of increasingly project-oriented ways of working. It is particularly important to stimulate interaction when new teams are formed to work closely together over a long period.

 

Read more in the full report on:

  • Room for innovation
  • More porous borders

 

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